Evan HauserMissoula, Montana


Evan Hauser, a ceramic and multimedia artist, works within the concepts of experiencing land and the way that land can directly influence a society. Originally from New Palestine, Indiana, Evan Hauser received his BFA from Herron School of Art + Design In Indianapolis, in 2014. While working on his BFA, Hauser worked at Sincerus Bronze Art as an artisan creating large-scale bronze sculptures.   Currently, Hauser lives in Missoula, Montana working on his MFA from the University of Montana.

The impact land has on the human experience goes beyond aesthetic beauty and resources, it constructs cultural and societal ideals in varying regions.  My interest in this relationship are between land and man.  Looking at prior decisions made and reasons behind my allowance in a specific location are the driving factors behind my research and ideas.  As an artist, I express this newfound research through objects of representation.  Objects of representation prove our existence and can be communicable icons in hopes of the viewer questioning their own relationship with land, even something as small as questioning their daily commute and how that route came to existence is within the boundaries of the work.

Seeing the cultural shift in perspective of land as I moved from Indiana to Montana showed me the difference in the interactions of land use across regions.  I am intrigued in how the difference of land and its terrain can shift and create a society paralleled with its functionality towards resources and domestication.  My works consists of icons as imagery to help promote discussions on themes such as land use, land management, alterations of land and the experience that are made while accessing land.

Processes of obtaining a final objects are intentional in their final material choice.  Materials within the work range from ceramic, glass, metal, wood, 3D printed plastics, cast polyurethane foam, and more.  I use various materials because I am interested in these intensive processes and the cultural associations of these materials.